July 2015

Library Guide to the Common Reading Book - A Long Way Gone

Posted by on Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 1:56pm
A Long Way Gone

Since 1997, incoming freshmen at ASU have been asked to read a book as part of their orientation to Appalachian State University. By participating in the Common Reading Program, students establish a common experience with other new students. 

This year's selection is A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah. Ishmael Beah was born in 1980 in the nation of Sierra Leone.  While Beah was still a young boy, his country descended into a horrific civil war, and Beah was forced to flee his village when rebels brutally attacked. Beah was picked up as a young teenager by the government army. While still at heart a gentle boy, he was nevertheless pressed into service as a government guerrilla soldier. 

Campus Events:

Fall Convocation
September 3, 2015 10:00 a.m., Holmes Convention Center

Q&A Panel Discussion with Faculty, Staff, and Students
Septermber 3, 2015 2:00 p.m., Blue Ridge Ballroom, Plemmons Student Union

Author Reading and Book Signing
September 3, 2015, 7:30 p.m., Blue Ridge Ballroom, Plemmons Student Union

For more information, see the Common Reading Program and the Library Guide to the Common Reading Book.



Reception honoring Tom and Anita Elliott

Posted by Scott Goldstein on Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 11:28am
Tom and Anita Elliott

Please join us for a reception honoring

Tom and Anita Elliott

celebrating their dedicated service to Appalachian State University

 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

at 2:00pm

The Solarium

Plemmons Student Union

 

For more information, please email Diana Barbee at barbeed@appstate.edu or call 828-262-6725

Free parking available in the Library Deck

Award-winning novelist and playwright Jim Grimsley to speak July 16 at Appalachian

Posted by on Monday, July 6, 2015 - 8:12am
Jim Grimsley

Jim Grimsley, known for his work as a novelist and playwright, will speak July 16 at Appalachian State University.

His talk, sponsored by Belk Library and Information Commons, begins at 4 p.m. in room 114 in the library. The event is free and the public is invited. A reception and book signing will follow his presentation.

His book “How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood,” published in April by Algonquin Books, has been called “a powerful meditation on race” by former U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey, and “a sensitive memoir that probes the past to discover what and how Grimsley learned about race, equality and democracy ‘from the good white people’ in his family and community,” according to Kirkus Reviews.

Grimsley also is the author of the science fiction novels “The Ordinary” and “The Last Green Tree,” and the dark comedy “Forgiveness.”

His other novels include “Winter Birds,” a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award; “Dream Boy,” winner of the Award for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Literature; “My Drowning,” a Lila-Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writer’s Award winner; and “Comfort and Joy,” a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

He has written 11 full-length and four one-act plays, including “Mr. Universe,” “The Lizard of Tarsus,” “White People” and “The Existentialists.” A collection of his plays, “Mr. Universe and Other Plays,” was published by Algonquin in 1998, and was a Lambda Literary Award finalist in drama.

Grimsley has been playwright-in-residence at 7Stages Theatre of Atlanta since 1986 and was playwright-in-residence at About Face Theatre of Chicago from 2000-04. In 1988 he was awarded the George Oppenheimer Award for Best New American Playwright for his play “Mr. Universe.” He was also awarded the first-ever Bryan Prize for Drama, presented by the Fellowship of Southern Writers in 1993 for distinguished achievement in playwriting.