Working Texts: The Religious Dialogue as Literary Fiction and Historical Artifact in Early Modern England (talk by Dr. Joshua Rodda)

Working Texts: The Religious Dialogue as Literary Fiction and Historical Artifact in Early Modern England

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at 2:00pm

Belk Library and Information Commons, room 421

Dr. Joshua Rodda will speak about how early modern English religious dialogue works were intended to be utilized and handled by contemporary readers, based on the research that he has conducted as the 2018–2019 Rhinehart Postdoctoral Fellow in British History. His lecture will include a period for viewing relevant and related selections from the Bill and Maureen Rhinehart Rare Book Collection on British History.

Dr. Rodda has spent the academic year at Appalachian State University conducting research in the Rhinehart Collection on British History in Special Collections about the history of Tudor and Stuart England through literature and theology. He is interested in the fictional religious dialogue in England in the early 17th century and how ordinary people interacted with religious writing and ideas. The Rhinehart Collection includes original printed copies of several of the dialogues in which he is interested, along with texts that contain background information for the project.

Dr. Rodda grew up in the United Kingdom, in the city of Lincoln. He received his undergraduate, master’s, and PhD degrees in history from the University of Nottingham. He is particularly interested in the 16th and 17th century and is passionate about writing and teaching. His first book Public Religious Disputation in England, 1558–1626 was published in 2014. In his research, he is especially fascinated by the Catholic and Protestant divide after the English Reformation and the interactions of people of different religions in this time period. He hopes to use his research with the Rhinehart Collection to complete a draft of his second book entitled Dialogue and the Early Stuart Church, 1603–1650.